Educating Addi: Learning and Living with Brian

My name is Addi and I am 8 years old. I also have a chronic illness, it’s called Little Brother Syndrome or LBS for short. It began just 4 months shy of my 4th birthday. The symptoms came on quite suddenly when mommy came home with Brian on Christmas Eve 2012. Soon I experienced a lack of attention, sudden feelings of nausea, and an acute pain in my butt.


Over the last few years I have learned to manage the symptoms with a steady diet of complaining to mommy and liquid prozac (ice cream). At times my symptoms completely disappear when mommy takes Brian to the Philadelphia Children’s Hospital. The hardest side effect to control though is missing my mommy. She has to leave weeks and sometimes months at a time with Brian while he receives treatment. As I have said before, I wish Brian didn’t have all of these problems. There isn’t a medication out there that helps me miss my mommy less. 

I love my brother Brian very much so I don’t want him to suffer. I also don’t want him to have any more problems because sometimes he gets all of the attention. Sure, my daddy and I go out to eat and watch the Cubbies while they are gone, but I still miss my mommy. At least I can read the box scores, understand how the baseball game works, I know the cities and mascots for most of the National league, and I know what a can of corn and a dinger are. I also know that when my daddy yells out “that ball was bryzzoed!” that Kris Bryant or Anthony Rizzo hit a bomb.  

I help my daddy with Pippa, the little girl we babysit and try to make my bed. I can fix my own hair now so daddy doesn’t mess it up anymore. I try to be good but I guess I can be a pain in the butt too sometimes.

It is hard enough having to learn and live with LBS but even harder to see my little brother suffer. When mommy has to chase him around the house to check his blood or give him a shot I feel sorry for him. I don’t think I want to have to watch mommy hold him down while they take blood either.

I love my baby brother very much and I love my mommy too. I hope she can get him fixed soon. I know they have to go back again in October so I hope it will be a short trip. Until then I will appreciate the time with mommy this summer, go to swim and dance lessons, and do my best to manage my symptoms. It is hard though with Brian running around yelling “chicken butt!” every time I try to speak or messing up my dollhouse, or hitting me, or not playing right, or splashing me in the tub, or well, you get the picture.

Addison Morgan

2nd grade

2017 LBS survivor

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Take a Breath

If I were a person who made rash decisions, instead of overthinking them to death, I would have called Matt this morning and told him to put the house on the market, pull Addi from school and figure out how we can move to Philly.

That might sound crazy, but after the appointment with the endocrinologist here, I have lost all faith in the doctors in Arizona.


The doctor we met with today is fantastic. He listened to the entire story from pregnancy till now, took note of all the symptoms we are concerned about, and gave a thoughtful response to our main issues. What was most concerning is that according to Brian’s medical records and from what this doctor can deduce, Brian may have been receiving the growth hormone for over a year without really needing it.

In October 2015, Brian was admitted into the hospital with a high fever, blood in his vomit, and low blood sugar. During that hospital week, here in Philadelphia, an endocrine team decided to do a fasting test. It was through this test that Brian was diagnosed with ketonic hypoglycemia. One part of the test showed that his growth hormone level was low. The doctors in Philly felt that this was not an immediate concern, and instructed us to find an endocrinologist at home who could oversee Brian’s care, and do further testing.

Now, almost 2 years later, we are learning that the doctor in Phoenix did not do the appropriate tests to truly confirm if Brian was not producing a growth hormone. Instead, it appears she misinterpreted the doctor’s notes from Philly and somehow, using just that information, managed to convince our insurance company to allow an MRI of Brian’s pituitary gland, and approve growth hormone medication. Of course, it is possible that another blood test offered more confirmation, but those records seem to have disappeared. It doesn’t help that this doctor shut her doors just this past February, and finding out any information is difficult. What we are certain of is that a main test needed to prove no growth hormone production has not been done.

So what does all of this mean? It means that for over a year and a half now I have been torturing my poor child with shots every single night. It means that Matt and I have put our lives on hold, out of concern for asking anyone to have to administer the shots. It means that wrong dosage or not, none of this was necessary. Or, maybe it was.

Unfortunately, to truly understand if any of this was necessary or not, we have to remove Brian from the growth hormone, monitor his blood sugar levels every single morning, and then put him through many more blood tests. Until the hormone is out of his body, we will not be able to determine if his body is producing any on its own.

The doctor we met with this morning will consult with the endocrinologist we started to see in Phoenix last month. If the doctor at home is on board, then I will remove the growth hormone from Brian’s regimen, we will monitor his blood every morning, and we will perform blood tests in less than a month, which hopefully will give us some concrete answers. One of the tests takes three hours and involves Brian being hooked up to an IV.

In addition to the blood test, the doctors will monitor Brian’s growth over the next 4 to 6 months to make sure he is staying where he should be on the growth scale. Any fluctuation, especially falling off the scale, would help to identify whether a growth hormone issue exists.

That being said, we are looking at flights for October to meet with the gastroenterologist, immunologist and endocrinologist here in Philadelphia to follow up on all of Brian’s care.

The endocrinologist here also decided to run some blood tests to check Brian’s current hormone levels, as well as his thyroid. Thyroid issues are common in Matt’s family, and may explain some of Brian’s issues. Additionally, he is running a urine test to check the acidity level in his urine, as well as protein. Unfortunately, more blood tests means that Brian had to be stuck with the “pointy thing” and is not very happy. Luckily, a new car was able to cheer him up.


Now that some time has passed, and as I sit waiting to hear from the doctor, I have been able to take a deep breath. I’m still seething angry with the state of care in Phoenix. It frustrates me that we have not been able to find a truly good doctor. More so, I am angry with myself for thinking the previous endocrinologist was so great. It makes me wonder if there have been other issues, and that is why she closed her doors.

Today’s appointment may not have brought solid answers to the table, but it did calm some of our questions and fears. For one, the likelihood that Brian will have to be on growth hormone for the rest of his life, if at all, is very unlikely. Additionally, the lack of change in his bone density on x-rays is nothing to be concerned about at this time. It is nice to meet with a doctor who listens to your questions and provides answers.

Waiting seems to be inevitable with our situation. So right now I will wait for a phone call from the doctor. I will wait to see whether I need to stop the growth hormone medication. I will wait to hear the results of today’s tests. I will wait for a plan.

Just like every time before, I am so grateful to be able to be here in Philadelphia and see doctors at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. I truly appreciate everything they and the people we have met here have done for us. I have said it many times before, but I will never regret making the decision to fly across the country to find treatment for my son.

Now I just need to focus on my breathing, calm down, and wait for the next step.

Woo Hoo

Great news!

We are seeing an endocrinologist tomorrow morning. Persistence, annoyance and prayers do work. I really appreciate the help from the endocrinology department and for putting up with my constant calls and begging.

Hopefully this will take us down the appropriate road to a solution. I will update after with any information and whether “pointy things” are involved.

Checking the Boxes

We just finished our appointment with the immunologist.  Right now I have mixed emotions.


The good news is that Brian’s test results look good for his age, growth and development. I’m grateful for the meeting with the doctor to explain things, because from the initial appearance, I would have overreacted.

The immunologist wants us to monitor Brian’s temperature and do weekly lymph node checks. At the last visit his lymph nodes were enlarged, but today she was not concerned.  After monitoring him closely, she wants to see us again in six months.

We discussed Brian’s various symptoms again, and she feels that while some seem to correspond with an immunology issue, more likely Brian’s endocrine system is the true culprit. She recommended that we try to see an endocrinologist at CHOP so all departments can collaborate together.

The request has led to me calling the endocrinology department and begging to be seen this week. Right now I’m anxiously waiting for a call back.

The logical part of me knows I should be happy with today’s appointment, where the emotional part is frustrated we flew across the country for positive test results. Still, a box has been checked. We will continue to monitor and hopefully endocrinology will be able to see us and more answers will be found.

Brian’s health does not fit in a perfect little package with a bow. It is complicated, which means finding answers will take time.

I am grateful for the thoughts, prayers and help we have received. While my emotions may get the better of me from time to time, I never regret the time spent with these specialists at such an amazing hospital.

More than anything, Brian sees today as a win, since there was no “pointy thing” in his arm. 

On a rainy day we play at Toys R Us.

Limbo and Prayers

Brian and I are happy to be home with Addi and Matt. Although this trip was short, I think the mental and emotional exhaustion makes the distance harder. As much as we love and appreciate the support from family and friends, ultimately Matt is the only other person who understands what I’m feeling, and even that isn’t a guarantee every time.

It is hard to sit through doctors’ appointments and listen to everything the doctors are saying while trying to control Brian, but I do my best. Usually I leave the appointments kicking myself for forgetting to ask a certain question. Even when I write questions down beforehand, I still feel overwhelmed by the information and walk away planning to check Google for answers, which never ends well.

Now we sit in limbo. It will be at least a week before any results are back. Today I booked two tickets back to Philadelphia for the end of May. It pains me to buy two tickets when I know Brian will end up in my lap. I will miss Addi’s last day of school, but I know she will be well taken care of thanks to Grandma and Miss Jaclyn…and her daddy. 😉


Tomorrow I will start calling the many doctors and setting up appointments. I’ll do my best to figure out the other details for our time there and make sure everything is planned out here at home.

As for today and every day over the next week, I will pray. I will pray for a positive test result. I will pray it will help us move forward. 


All I can ask is that you pray too.